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Languages

  • Japanese
  • Māori

Japanese

Japanese language learning is for students for whom Japanese is an additional language.

Learning new languages gives us insights into various worldviews and cultural expectations. We live in a technologically advanced age that enables us to work together, both remotely and in person, with people from a range of different cultural and language backgrounds.

Being able to see things from different points of view gives language learners an advantage when it comes to collaboration and communication - an important advantage in our increasingly connected global community. Not only does learning a new language make it easier to learn additional languages later in life, studies show that language learning boosts students’ achievement in other subjects, as well as improving literacy levels.

Beginners are welcome to join the course and will be given an individualised programme to work on, to ensure that the basics are covered before attempting NCEA.

Japanese - NCEA Level 1

Programme Description :

In Level 1 Japanese we build on the skills and abilities developed in Year 10, in spoken and written Japanese communication, starting with familiar topics such as our everyday lives. We will cover topics such as:

  • Whakawhanaungatanga - building relationships and establishing connections. Students will learn how to build relationships by sharing information about themselves, where they live, and their culture(s) with Japanese speaking people.
  • Manaakitanga. As with the Japanese concept of omotenashi, manaakitanga is about putting others first before yourself by supporting others, being of service to others and making sure visitors are looked after and cared for. Students will learn about culturally appropriate behaviour in Japan, and develop an awareness of culturally appropriate behaviour and etiquette in different contexts (eg, at home, at play and at school).
  • Hauora - wellbeing. Students will explore the importance of looking after their wellbeing. Taha tinana (body); taha hinengaro (mental/ emotional); taha wairua (spiritual); taha whānau (social).

Learning Outcomes/Contexts:

  • We explore how the Japanese language is structured, making comparisons with English, te reo Māori and other known languages.
  • We deepen our understanding of Japanese culture(s) and make comparisons with other known cultures.
  • We use our Japanese communication skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) to express our personal ideas and respond to the ideas and opinions of others.

Skills and Capabilities:

Students in Level 1 Japanese are supported to develop their self-management and independent learning skills, as well as their ability to work creatively and collaboratively with others, not only here at school but also with students in Japan through online collaboration and actual school visits during our Japan trip.

Cross Curriculum Links:

Japanese Language learning links to and complements learning in English; Te Reo Māori; Social Sciences; Visual Arts; Tourism and Hospitality.

Possibly leads to :

  • Japanese is a University Entrance approved subject.
  • Study and work opportunities overseas.
  • Job opportunities with international companies in New Zealand.
  • Employers in Japan are keen to employ bilingual (English and Japanese-speaking) people in a wide range of fields, including marketing and advertising, IT, animation, education, hospitality and tourism.

Assessment Opportunities:

The internal assessment is a project that you work on during the year. You will communicate information in Japanese on a topic of your choice. Topics might include sharing an interest, promoting an event or business, or communicating about an experience. The work you submit could be entirely written, entirely spoken, or a combination of speaking and writing. For example, you might create a web page where you write a brief passage about your topic, and include a video that you have created, with voiceover in Japanese.

The end of year external assessments focus on reading and listening comprehension. The written texts and listening passages are in Japanese, with the questions and answers in English.

Credits:

The Level 1 Japanese Language course offers 15 credits.

Japanese - NCEA Level 2

Programme Description :

In Level 2 Japanese we build on the skills and abilities developed in Level 1, in spoken and written Japanese communication.

  • The Term 1 topic of Family Life involves a fair bit of revision and consolidation of previous learning, while at the same time extending our skills.
  • We then move on to learning about eating and drinking in Japan, as well as shopping for food.
  • Finally, we learn what high school life is like for students in Japan.

Learning Outcomes/Contexts:

  • Use spoken and written Japanese to convey and understand information, ideas, and opinions in different contexts and through increasingly complex and varied text types.
  • Explore the views of others, developing and sharing personal perspectives.
  • Be able to communicate appropriately in different situations.
  • Engage in longer interactions and produce extended text.
  • Analyse how the Japanese language is structured in different texts and for different purposes.
  • Explore how meaning is conveyed across languages.
  • Analyse how cultural meanings are expressed in Japanese.

Skills and Capabilities:

Students in Level 2 Japanese continue to develop their independent learning skills through a self-paced programme that blends online learning with face-to-face discussion and interaction opportunities.

Cross Curriculum Links:

Japanese Language learning links to and complements learning in English; Te Reo Māori; Social Sciences; Visual Arts; Tourism and Hospitality.

Possibly leads to :

  • Study and work opportunities overseas.
  • Job opportunities with international companies in New Zealand.
  • Employers in Japan are keen to employ bilingual (English and Japanese-speaking) people in a wide range of fields, including marketing and advertising, IT, animation, education, hospitality and tourism.
  • Japanese is a University Entrance approved subject.

Assessment Opportunities:

Written and spoken communication are assessed through portfolio-style internal assessments, where students keep adding small pieces of work to their portfolios throughout the year and choose their best two pieces to polish up for assessment at the end of the year.

The end of year external assessments focus on reading and listening comprehension. The written texts and listening passages are in Japanese, with the questions and answers in English.

Credits:

The Level 2 Japanese Language course offers 15 credits.

Japanese - NCEA Level 3

Programme Description :

  • In Level 3 Japanese we build on the skills and abilities developed in Level 2, in spoken and written Japanese communication.
  • In Term 1 our topic of Leisure Activities allows us time for revision and consolidation of previous learning, while at the same time extending our communication skills and language knowledge.
  • We then move on to learning about the land and people of Japan in a geography-based topic of study.
  • Our third topic is Japan at Work, in which we compare and contrast Japan’s workplace culture(s) with that of other countries.

Learning Outcomes/Contexts:

  • Use spoken and written Japanese to convey and understand information, ideas, and opinions in different contexts and through increasingly complex and varied text types.
  • Explore the views of others, developing and sharing personal perspectives.
  • Be able to communicate appropriately in different situations.
  • Engage in longer interactions and produce extended text.
  • Analyse how the Japanese language is structured in different texts and for different purposes.
  • Explore how meaning is conveyed across languages.
  • Analyse how cultural meanings are expressed in Japanese.

Skills and Capabilities:

Students in Level 3 Japanese continue to develop their independent learning skills through a self-paced programme that blends online learning with face-to-face discussion and interaction opportunities.

Cross Curriculum Links:

Japanese Language learning links to and complements learning in English; Te Reo Māori; Social Sciences; Visual Arts; Tourism and Hospitality.

Possibly leads to :

  • Study and work opportunities overseas.
  • Job opportunities with international companies in New Zealand.
  • Employers in Japan are keen to employ bilingual (English and Japanese-speaking) people in a wide range of fields, including marketing and advertising, IT, animation, education, hospitality and tourism.
  • Japanese is a University Entrance approved subject.Students who achieve in Japanese at NCEA Level 3 are generally able to skip the introductory Japanese language courses at universities.

Assessment Opportunities:

Written and spoken communication are assessed through portfolio-style internal assessments, where students keep adding small pieces of work to their portfolios throughout the year and choose their best two pieces to polish up for assessment at the end of the year.

The end of year external assessments focus on reading and listening comprehension. The written texts and listening passages are in Japanese, with the questions and answers in English.

Credits:

The Level 3 Japanese Language course offers 15 credits.

Japanese is a University Entrance approved subject.

Akoranga Māori - Māori Studies

Re Reo Māori - NCEA Level 1

Programme Description:

This course aims to build students’ skills in whakarongo, kõrero, pãnui, tuhituhi and waihanga tuhinga at Level 5-6 of the NZ Curriculum, building on the Māori language learning in Years 9 and 10. There is a strong focus on encouraging and supporting students to consistently achieve to the best of their ability.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will apply a range of communicative skills in a variety of contexts that will enable them to express their thoughts in te reo Māori with accuracy, fluency, cultural integrity and gain an understanding of language revitalisation.
  • Students of Te Reo Māori will develop self-managing skills and strategies that will enable them to know when to lead or follow, and when and how to act independently or collectively for the benefit of te ao Māori.
  • Students of Te Reo Māori will apply creative and critical thinking, as well as metacognitive processes to make sense of information, experiences and ideas which will inspire them to be lifelong learners of te reo Māori.
  • Students of Te Reo Māori, in tandem with learning tikanga Māori, will strengthen their own identity, therefore, providing a strong foundation for them to create and nurture relationships with others and the environment.
  • The ideas, values and attitudes developed from a Māori worldview expressed through te reo Māori will enable students of Te Reo Māori to be culturally confident and competent to participate in and contribute to Māorix language and culture revitalisation within their communities.

Skills and Capabilities:

The five main language skills necessary for effective communication, namely listening, speaking, reading, writing and cultural awareness, are interrelated, and this will be reflected in the teaching and learning programme for Te Reo Māori.

Cross Curriculum Links:

Te reo Māori and mātauranga Māori link to and underpin learning in all curriculum areas English; other languages; Social Sciences; Physical Education and Health; Technologies; The Arts, Science and Mathematics.

Possibly Leads to:

Te Reo Māori is a University Entrance approved subject. In a country such as Aotearoa, based on a bicultural (indigenous and non-indigenous) partnership, the ability to understand and communicate in te reo Māori is an essential skill that enables better participation in all aspects of society and can underpin success in all walks of life.

Assessment Opportunities:

Written and spoken communication and listening comprehension are assessed through portfolio-style internal assessments, where students add small pieces of work to their portfolios throughout the year and choose their best two pieces to submit for assessment at the end of the year.

The two end of year external assessments focus on reading comprehension and written expression. 14-16 Credits available from internally and externally assessed achievement standards.

Re Ao Māori - NCEA Level 1

Programme Description:

This course is designed for students who are interested in aspects of te ao Māori, the Māori world. You will be encouraged to explore and develop your passions which will guide your course selection and structure. These could include:

  • Reo Māori - Māori Language e.g. Learning the Language
  • Te Ao Haka - Māori performing Arts e.g. Kapa Haka, P.A.T., Dance, Music
  • Toi Māori - Visual and Creative Arts e.g. Raranga Tukutuku, Kōwhaiwhai, Whakairo
  • Kōrero tuku iho - Social History e.g. Hawaiki, Waka Migrations, Atua Māori, Karakia
  • Tōrangapu - NZ & Māori Politics e.g. Tiriti o Waitangi, NZ Wars, Colonisation, Māori Religion
  • Mau Rākau & Hauora - Health & P.E. e.g. Traditional Games, Weaponry & Medicines, Waka Ama Language and culture go hand-in-hand. While te reo Māori may not be your main focus in this course, an understanding of some Māori words, values and concepts is important for your understanding of all things te ao Māori, and will be integrated into the learning.

Possible Learning Outcomes:

  • Develop language skills (writing, speaking, listening, reading) in te reo Māori to express personal information, to share opinions and to connect to social contexts like school, sport, and marae.
  • Expand your presenting, expressive and creative skills through visual and performing arts where you learn to use other mediums to communicate.
  • Discover Māori social history from the beginning of creation as we journey from Hawaikī in the great voyaging waka using karakia, pepeha, whakapapa and the celestial bodies to guide us
  • Explore the land and its tangata whenua - local people, the forging of a new nation and the inevitable conflict between two differing cultures
  • Train and heal our bodies using Māori weaponry, games, sports and traditional medicines

Skills and Capabilities:

  • Karakia: is able to do some karakia in some contexts
  • Mihi & Whaikōrero: follows simple formal patterns of acknowledgements & oratory
  • Tikanga: knows what to do in some kaupapa Māori contexts (e.g. blessing kai, pōwhiri- welcome process, general knowledge of tikanga)
  • Waiata: knows and performs some simple waiata in a group context
  • Manaakitanga: follows protocols of manaaki- care and compassion for all things
  • Rangatiratanga: develops leadership qualities within kaupapa Māori
  • Kaitiakitanga: understands guardianship and sustainability of the environment
  • Mana: develops independence and autonomy

Cross Curriculum Links:

Kaupapa Māori links to all aspects of life in New Zealand. Skills and understanding developed in this course complement learning in English; Te Reo Māori and other languages; Social Sciences; Visual and Performing Arts; Tourism and Hospitality; PE and Health, and Environmental Science.

Possibly leads to :

  • Language & Tikanga Based Work Opportunities:
    • Media; Education; Business & Consultancy; Iwi, Council & Bi-Cultural Relations Advisor; Spiritual Advisor; Tourism Business & Hospitality Industry;
  • Performance, Arts & Research Based Work Opportunities:
    • Tourism & Hospitality Industry; Stage & Film Industry; Traditional & Modern Music Performer; Anthropologist & Researcher, Navigator, Tattooist, Carver, Visual Artist, Weaver, Weapons Expert & Consultant

Assessment Opportunities:

A variety of practical, written and oral internal assessments will be offered based on the students strengths and interests. 14-16 Credits available from internally and externally assessed unit and achievement standards

Re Ao Māori - NCEA Level 2

Programme Description:

This course is designed for students who are interested in aspects of te ao Māori, the Māori world. You will be encouraged to explore and develop your passions which will guide your course selection and structure. These could include:

  • Reo Māori - Māori Language e.g. Learning the Language
  • Te Ao Haka - Māori performing Arts e.g. Kapa Haka, P.A.T., Dance, Music
  • Toi Māori - Visual and Creative Arts e.g. Raranga Tukutuku, Kōwhaiwhai, Whakairo
  • Kōrero tuku iho - Social History e.g. Hawaiki, Waka Migrations, Atua Māori, Karakia
  • Tōrangapu - NZ & Māori Politics e.g. Tiriti o Waitangi, NZ Wars, Colonisation, Māori Religion
  • Mau Rākau & Hauora - Health & P.E. e.g. Traditional Games, Weaponry & Medicines, Waka Ama Language and culture go hand-in-hand. While te reo Māori may not be your main focus in this course, an understanding of some Māori words, values and concepts is important for your understanding of all things te ao Māori, and will be integrated into the learning.

Possible Learning Outcomes:

  • Develop language skills (writing, speaking, listening, reading) in te reo Māori to express personal information, to share opinions and to connect to social contexts like school, sport, and marae.
  • Expand your presenting, expressive and creative skills through visual and performing arts where you learn to use other mediums to communicate.
  • Discover Māori social history from the beginning of creation as we journey from Hawaikī in the great voyaging waka using karakia, pepeha, whakapapa and the celestial bodies to guide us
  • Explore the land and its tangata whenua - local people, the forging of a new nation and the inevitable conflict between two differing cultures
  • Train and heal our bodies using Māori weaponry, games, sports and traditional medicines

Skills and Capabilities:

  • Karakia: confidently does karakia in most contexts
  • Mihi & Whaikōrero: follows formal patterns of acknowledgements & oratory
  • Tikanga: knows what to do in most kaupapa Māori contexts (e.g. blessing kai, pōwhiri- welcome process, general knowledge of tikanga)
  • Waiata: knows and performs appropriate waiata in a group context
  • Manaakitanga: demonstrates protocols of manaaki- care and compassion for all things
  • Rangatiratanga: models leadership qualities within kaupapa Māori and school
  • Kaitiakitanga: demonstrates guardianship and sustainability of the environment
  • Mana: builds independence and autonomy

Cross Curriculum Links:

Kaupapa Māori links to all aspects of life in New Zealand. Skills and understanding developed in this course complement learning in English; Te Reo Māori and other languages; Social Sciences; Visual and Performing Arts; Tourism and Hospitality; PE and Health, and Environmental Science.

Possibly leads to :

  • Language & Tikanga Based Work Opportunities:
    • Media; Education; Business & Consultancy; Iwi, Council & Bi-Cultural Relations Advisor; Spiritual Advisor; Tourism Business & Hospitality Industry;
  • Performance, Arts & Research Based Work Opportunities:
    • Tourism & Hospitality Industry; Stage & Film Industry; Traditional & Modern Music Performer; Anthropologist & Researcher, Navigator, Tattooist, Carver, Visual Artist, Weaver, Weapons Expert & Consultant

Assessment Opportunities:

A variety of practical, written and oral internal assessments will be offered based on the students strengths and interests. 14-16 Credits available from internally and externally assessed unit and achievement standards. 14-16 Credits available from internally and externally assessed unit and achievement standards.

Re Ao Māori - NCEA Level 3

Programme Description:

This course is designed for students who are interested in aspects of te ao Māori, the Māori world. You will be encouraged to explore and develop your passions which will guide your course selection and structure. These could include:

  • Reo Māori - Māori Language e.g. Learning the Language
  • Te Ao Haka - Māori performing Arts e.g. Kapa Haka, P.A.T., Dance, Music
  • Toi Māori - Visual and Creative Arts e.g. Raranga Tukutuku, Kōwhaiwhai, Whakairo
  • Kōrero tuku iho - Social History e.g. Hawaiki, Waka Migrations, Atua Māori, Karakia
  • Tōrangapu - NZ & Māori Politics e.g. Tiriti o Waitangi, NZ Wars, Colonisation, Māori Religion
  • Mau Rākau & Hauora - Health & P.E. e.g. Traditional Games, Weaponry & Medicines, Waka Ama Language and culture go hand-in-hand. While te reo Māori may not be your main focus in this course, an understanding of some Māori words, values and concepts is important for your understanding of all things te ao Māori, and will be integrated into the learning.

Possible Learning Outcomes:

  • Develop language skills (writing, speaking, listening, reading) in te reo Māori to express personal information, to share opinions and to connect to social contexts like school, sport, and marae.
  • Expand your presenting, expressive and creative skills through visual and performing arts where you learn to use other mediums to communicate.
  • Discover Māori social history from the beginning of creation as we journey from Hawaikī in the great voyaging waka using karakia, pepeha, whakapapa and the celestial bodies to guide us
  • Explore the land and its tangata whenua - local people, the forging of a new nation and the inevitable conflict between two differing cultures
  • Train and heal our bodies using Māori weaponry, games, sports and traditional medicines

Skills and Capabilities:

  • Karakia: can confidently select karakia appropriate to the context, from a repertoire of known karakia
  • Mihi & Whaikōrero: is able to use formal patterns of acknowledgements & oratory to respond to topics of the occasion
  • Tikanga: confidently leads in kaupapa Māori contexts (e.g. blessing kai, pōwhiri- welcome process, general knowledge of tikanga)
  • Waiata: can confidently select waiata appropriate to the context, from a repertoire of known waiata
  • Manaakitanga: demonstrates protocols of manaaki- care and compassion for all things
  • Rangatiratanga: models leadership qualities within kaupapa Māori and school
  • Kaitiakitanga: demonstrates guardianship and sustainability of the environment
  • Mana: builds independence and autonomy

Cross Curriculum Links:

Kaupapa Māori links to all aspects of life in New Zealand. Skills and understanding developed in this course complement learning in English; Te Reo Māori and other languages; Social Sciences; Visual and Performing Arts; Tourism and Hospitality; PE and Health, and Environmental Science.

Possibly leads to :

  • Language & Tikanga Based Work Opportunities:
    • Media; Education; Business & Consultancy; Iwi, Council & Bi-Cultural Relations Advisor; Spiritual Advisor; Tourism Business & Hospitality Industry;
  • Performance, Arts & Research Based Work Opportunities:
    • Tourism & Hospitality Industry; Stage & Film Industry; Traditional & Modern Music Performer; Anthropologist & Researcher, Navigator, Tattooist, Carver, Visual Artist, Weaver, Weapons Expert & Consultant

Assessment Opportunities:

A variety of practical, written and oral internal assessments will be offered based on the students strengths and interests.

MBAS HOUSE POINTS

House points after the Cross Country.

Buffalo 1462 points

58/100

Tainui 1516 points

60/100

Mercury 1743 points

69/100

Matahaorua 1057 points

42/100